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TRACING A WORD IN MACBETHDuring our study of Macbeth, you will each be responsible for keeping a “word journal” (essay/project grade) in which you identify how the meaning of a specific word is shaped by the situation in which it is used and the character who uses it. At various times, you will meet in class with your “act group,” all of the students assigned to a specific act, and your “word group,” all of the students assigned to a specific word.Starting at the beginning of the act you were assigned, find the word (either blood, hand, night, man or sleep) every time it appears. Each time you find the word, make an entry in your word journal.Guidelines for Each Entry:Write out the passage that contains your word and give act, scene, and line numbers (for example, 2.3.3-5). Record enough of the passage to make its meaning clear; avoid cutting it off in mid-thought. Identify the speaker.Banquo: “How goes the night, boy?/The moon is down. FleanceI have not heard the clock./BanquoAnd she goes down at twelve.”(2.1.1-3)Banquo: “I dreamt last night of the three Weird Sisters”(2.1.25)Lady Macbeth: “It was the owl that shrieked, the fatal bellman / Which gives the stern’st good-night.”(2.2.5-6) Lady Macbeth: “Get on your nightgown, lest occasion call us / And show us to be watchers.”(2.2.90-91) Macduff: “I believe drink gave thee the lie last night.”(2.3.39)Lennox: “The night has been unruly. Where we lay,/ Our chimneys were blown down and, as they say,/ Lamenting hear in’ the’ air, strange screams of/ death”(2.3.61-63)Lennox: “dire combustion and confused events/ New hatched to the’ woeful time. The obscure bird/ Clammored the livelong night. Some say the earth/ Was feverous and did shake.”(2.3.66-69)Macbeth: “‘Twas a rough night”(2.3.70)Old Man: “Threescore and ten I can remember well,/Within the volume of which time I have seen/ Hours dreadful and things strange, but this sore/ night/ Hath trifled former knowings”(2.4.1-5)Ross: “Thou seest the heavens, as troubled with man’s act,/ Threatens his bloody stage. By th’clock ’tis day,/ And yet dark night strangles the traveling lamp./ is’t night’s predominance of the day’s shame/ That darkness does the face of the ear entomb”(2.4.7-11)Clarify the meaning of the passage by putting it into your own words. This is called paraphrasing. Then briefly explain what is happening in the play at the time the words in this passage are spoken.Banquo and his son, are in Macbeth’s court at Glamis. This opens act 2 and tells readers what time of day it is. Banquo has been wanting to tell Macbeth about the dream he had about the witches. Now he is finally getting the chance to talk to him.Lady Macbeth compares an owl’s shriek to a death toll on the night of Duncan’s murder. The good-night is given from the bellman, which could be Duncan and how he is dead. After the murder King Duncan, Lady Macbeth is trying to get Macbeth to sleep because all he can think about is the murder and the immense guilt he feels. She is making him put on the nightgown because once he puts it on he will soon fall asleep. Macduff is saying how the lie was given by the drink last nightLennox says how the night is unruly and how it affects the future of the kingdom. So when Duncan’s dead body is discovered the night has truly been unruly.Lennox and Macbeth are having a conversation, and  even though Lennox has no idea about the murder, the word night adds to the dark mood. Macbeth with Lennox about what he thinks happened last nightMacbeth and Lady Macbeth are distraught about what happened the previous nightRoss is comparing and questions the night and day. Night is dark and shows evil and corrupts all of the light in its way.              Draw conclusions about how the word is used. For example, compare the passage to one you recorded earlier by explaining how the meaning of your word is affected by the character who uses it and the situation in which it is used.The word night is used has very little meaning to the characters when it is first used. Compared to the first usage of night, this has a greater significance. The fact that Banquo is dreaming about the Witches shows…. Lady Macbeth is telling Macbeth that it is time to kill Duncan tonight and  she is saying even though it is scary now is your time to kill Duncan. This shows how manipulating Lady Macbeth isThe second time Lady Macbeth uses the word night shows how she cares about Macbeth. She is telling him to “get on your nightgown” because Lady Macbeth does not someone to walk by and see that the both of them are awake. Similar to before, Lady Macbeth helps Macbeth in tough situations and pushes for his wellbeing/ protection. Macduff, is using this same as the first to indicate what all went wrong. He is saying I believe the drink did this to you last night. Lennox is saying that the night has been rough and chaotic. People heard screams of death in the air and chimneys blew down. He saying that not only he had a rough night but others did too. Lennox continues onto complain about the horrible night. He is saying that the owl shrieked all night long and it is used in the same context as when he said the night was rough. Macbeth is saying it was a rough night is funny because he spend his night killing Duncan whilst everyone else had an unruly terrible night. The night for him you could say as rough but also you could say he became king that night so it was not as rough. But mostly the word night here is to provide some humor and to keep Lennox and Macbeth’s conversation going. Even though the clock says it is day, the darkness of the night is so strong that it seems dark when it is supposed to be light. This usage of night has the deepest meaning than any before, it is saying that the evil is so consuming that the day is drowned out. It also relates to what happens to Macbeth, he gets so high on power and ambition that everything he loves gets drowned out and when it is over he is alone. At the end of your act, use the journal to draw more conclusions: What character uses the word most often? How does the denotation and connotation of the word change from character to character? Is there an unusual use of the word? How does this word affect the act you studied?There is not one character that uses the word more than the other, but Lady Macbeth, Banquo, and Lennox say it twice each throughout the whole act. When Lady Macbeth says the word night it is to calm Macbeth down and get him to sleep. She tells him to wish the stSample Word JournalThis is what an entry might look like for the word blood in Act 1. Banquo: “How goes the night,boy?”(2.1.1)How are you doing tonight son?  Banquo is talking to his son about the time and sets the scene where Macbeth and Banquo are going to meet. Banquo: “I dreamt last night of the three Weird Sisters”(2.1.25)Why is Banquo dreaming of the Weird Sisters? Banquo maybe mentions his dream of the weird sisters to show his concern for Macbeth. This pushes Banquo to have a conversation with Macbeth about his actions.  Mentioning this shows how easily evilness can consume you. Lady Macbeth: “It was the owl that shrieked, the fatal bellman / Which gives the stern’st good-night.”(2.2.5-6)Lady Macbeth is trying to snap Macbeth out of the state he is in. He is traumatized by what he has done to Duncan and feels immense guilt. The bellman could be representing Duncan and how it was fate by the witches he died.Lady Macbeth could be telling Macbeth to say good-night to Duncan to help him accept that it was fate that drove Macbeth to kill him. Lady Macbeth: “Get on your nightgown, lest occasion call us / And show us to be watchers.”(2.2.90-91)She is telling Macbeth to go bed. And when the time comes we will show ourselves into the world Same as before, Lady Macbeth is trying to get Macbeth to calm down. Later she says “Be not lost/So poorly in your thoughts”(2.2.91-92) to get Macbeth to bed to sleep off the guilt he is feeling.This shows how much Lady Macbeth cares about Macbeth Macduff: “I believe drink gave thee the lie last night.”(2.3.39)Telling what happened last nightLennox: “The night has been unruly. Where we lay,/ Our chimneys were blown down and, as they say,/ Lamenting hear in’ the’ air, strange screams of/ death”(2.3.61-63)Lennox is foreshadowing the dead King Duncan. The weather is stormy and you can hear screams of death…. Dramatic irony!The audience knows that Macbeth killed the king that night but Macduff and Lennox have no clue. Lennox: “dire combustion and confused events/ New hatched to the’ woeful time. The obscure bird/ Clammored the livelong night. Some say the earth/ Was feverous and did shake.”(2.3.66-69)The night was very lively and longMacbeth: “‘Twas a rough night”(2.3.70)Adds some humor and irony because of course Macbeth was having a rough night, he was killing the king!Old Man: “Threescore and ten I can remember well,/Within the volume of which time I have seen/ Hours dreadful and things strange, but this sore/ night/ Hath trifled former knowings”(2.4.1-5)Metaphor, the night is sore. The Old Man and Ross are talking about the unnatural happening they have been seeing. He is saying that he has seen dreadful and strange in the past 70 years of his life, but this sore night has made his earlier experiences seem insignificant.Ross: “Thou seest the heavens, as troubled with man’s act,/ Threatens his bloody stage. By th’clock ’tis day,/ And yet dark night strangles the traveling lamp./ is’t night’s predominance of the day’s shame/ That darkness does the face of the ear entomb”(2.4.7-11)When the night strangles the sun it is a personification and it shows how the darkness Macbeth has created flooded the kingdom and no everything seems ruined.Gabby SullivanMrs. MonroeEnglish H1-24-18

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